Créole


When we hear 'créole'/'creole'/'kreyol', many of us automatically think of New Orleans.
However, 'La Louisiane' represents only a very small part of créole culture which took its name from the Spanish criollo.
It originally referred to French, Spanish and Portuguese people who were born in one of the many European colonies in America and Africa, as opposed to those who migrated there as adults.
In time, the criollo populations came to be dominated by people of mixed ancestry.
Créole languages were created by decendents of European, African, Native American and Indian people, who needed to communicate, and along the way gave birth to a huge variety of regional dialects and accents.

Today, Créole people are mainly found in Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Dominica, French Guiana and Saint Lucia, but also in Louisiana, Mauritius, Reunion, the Seychelles and West Africa.
Most other Caribbean countries have créole influences and créole cuisine is fascinating as we can observe many similarities in the cooking styles of people separated by thousands of kilometers across the globe.   Créole culture includes music and dance, art and architecture, folklore, myths, literature, games, rituals, festivals and, above all, FOOD.